EXILE Baldwin to Berlin Photographs by Corey Glass & Laura Jones

Peace

 

058AFBA0-3F21-43FA-A9DB-B93CE901FC9CPhotographs by

COREY GLASS

LAURA JONES

Monday May 11

7 pm to 9 pm

Portland Room @ The Spoke Club

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600 King St. W.

music by Richard Underhill & Kevin Barrett

cash bar | finger food | silent auction

$5 suggested donation

 

Photographs by two generations of U.S. war resisters:

LAURA JONES came to Canada during the Vietnam War. Her story and photos of the U.S. exile community on Baldwin Street in Toronto were recently featured on CBC’s Doc Zone . COREY GLASS is a former U.S. National Guardsmen and Iraq War veteran who sought refuge in Canada in 2006 after making the conscientious decision not to return to the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq.

His story was featured in a recent issue of New York Magazine as well as NOW Magazine.

A fundraising event organized by

FRIENDS OF COREY GLASS & WAR RESISTERS SUPPORT CAMPAIGN

 

 

 

Getting The Lead Out of South Riverdale

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Here’s a news clip from 1987. At this point, it had been over 15-years of community struggle to “Get The Lead Out” of young children’s blood (caused by emissions from the Canada Metal Co., a lead smelter on Eastern Ave. in Toronto).  Drawing attention to the problem included dumping soil at the hazardous waste depot. The struggle became “Getting The Lead Out”  as each problem was successfully resolved. The community fought for on going blood testing, air monitoring, pollution control, removal of toxic soil, and reduction of toxic house dust.  The lead industry sued the media, (including the CBC and individual journalists), hospital and medical professionals and some community members. Still the community persisted.

Clean-up occurred on 1000  South Riverdale residential properties and three schools. The level of lead in children’s blood dropped. It was nearly another thirty years until the source of the problem moved. A few times after the clean-up, Canada Metal exceeded the acceptable air quality level. The lead industry contributed nothing towards the $11 million clean-up and continued to operate owing the city years of back taxes.


Today, a business related to the film industry owns the land and is a much welcomed neighbor.

More of the news coverage of the process:

Detroit – Blight and Bright

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All Photos by Laura Jones 2011